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The focus of this blog is simple - and that's the goal too. A more simple way of life. A life in tune with the rhythms of nature and of human nature. Where everything has its time and place and purpose, including us.

We have left the rat race behind and taken on new challenges. We aim to tread as lightly as we can upon the planet, to reconnect with nature, to eat good food, drink excellent wine, enjoy the best of company.... even if that is sometimes just our own! Please feel free to eavesdrop from time to time on our lives and see how we are doing and if you are ever in Extremadura... drop us an email and we'll give you directions.

Friday, 10 June 2011

Mustard

It's too late now to go back on my plans for the 1920's picnic but I am realising that I have set myself rather a large challenge.  I wanted everything to be very much like when my father was a young lad... and I decided early on that I wouldn't buy 'crap' ready made picnic food from the supermarket, but I would make it myself.  I am always banging on to people about how much better home made food tastes anyway, so most of the people coming would be very disappointed to be presented with bought sausage rolls etc...

...anyway... I find myself with very little time (so why am I on here?) and soooo much to do.  One of the easiest jobs is making mustard....


Take a teacupful of yellow mustard seeds and a teacupful of black mustards seeds and soak them overnight in as much beer as will cover them (I used home made elderberry wine this time instead of beer).  the following day, you strain them and add a little salt and 6fluid oz o f cider vinegar and 6 tablespoons of runny honey (I use only the cheap stuff in cooking)



...and a tablespoon of grated nutmeg.


You then whizz them up in a liquidizer until you get the consistency you want - if it seems to be too runny at the start then strain the mustard seeds and add the liquid back to them a little at a time while they are whizzing around the machine... that way you are in total control of the final consistency.


The mustard can then be potted into previously sterilised jars and put away in the cupboard.  It takes only a day for the flavour to develop so you don't have to keep it for ages before using it, but I do think a week or two improves it even further.   It keeps for a very long time (ours never lasts that long but about a year I would say)... but once you open the jar I would store it in the fridge.


Now I need to make fifty small sausage rolls for the freezer....


Mustard goes really well with good sausage rolls.


Oh I forgot to mention that because I have a houseful of people and some will be sleeping in the conservatory I have finally decided to make the blinds so that they don't get woken up by the sun at 4 am...



so I have six roman blinds to fit some rather large windows to make from scratch... here is a large bag of fabric looking at me accusingly!


And.... I still don't have a costume to wear.... so what am I doing sitting here typing... preserving my sanity.. that's what.  There... I feel a bit better now... right where was I... Oh yes... sausage rolls....

2 comments:

  1. Any room for one more in the conservatory, ha ha. I love grainy mustard on anything, I also put it in cooking. And I use cheap honey in my hot drinks.

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  2. Oh bless the woman who sets herself far too many challenges to reasonably complete in the time she has.

    I live with one of those, she has never missed a deadline yet but cut's it mighty fine sometimes.

    Hope it all goes well for you and I am going to remember that recipe.

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